Next Meeting Date: Monday August 5th, 7:00 pm at Tennent Church (Old Scots’ Hall) in Englishtown, NJ

The next BRAVO meeting is Monday, August 5th, 7:00 pm meeting at Tennent Church (Old Scots’ Hall) in Englishtown, NJ and will feature noted archaeologist Richard Veit, Ph.D as our guest speaker. He will present a slide show on:

Searching for the Citadel at Morristown National Historical Park: Monmouth University’s Summer 2017-2018 Field Schools

Abstract: Monmouth University’s summer 2017 field school was a cooperative project between Monmouth University’s Department of History and Anthropology, Rutgers University Newark’s Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and the National Park Service. The project investigated Fort Hill, aka the Citadel, and associated camps in the Jockey Hollow area of Morristown National Historical Park. It was designed to determine the extent and integrity of the archaeological deposits on Fort Hill, while testing the value of remote sensing techniques, most notably induced polarization, a form of resistivity. Testing was carried out at a Revolutionary War fortification constructed in 1780 and a hut site associated with the encampments of 1779-1780 and 1780-1781. Fieldwork consisted of a geophysical survey and photogrammetry, followed by shovel test pits, excavation units, and metal detecting. In the shallow rocky soils at Jockey Hollow, metal detecting and photogrammetry proved to be the most useful investigative techniques.

Monmouth University’s summer 2017 field school was a cooperative project between Monmouth University’s Department of History and Anthropology, Rutgers University Newark’s Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and the National Park Service. The project investigated Fort Hill, aka the Citadel, and associated camps in the Jockey Hollow area of Morristown National Historical Park. It was designed to determine the extent and integrity of the archaeological deposits on Fort Hill, while testing the value of remote sensing techniques, most notably induced polarization, a form of resistivity. Testing was carried out at a Revolutionary War fortification constructed in 1780 and a hut site associated with the encampments of 1779-1780 and 1780-1781. Fieldwork consisted of a geophysical survey and photogrammetry, followed by shovel test pits, excavation units, and metal detecting. In the shallow rocky soils at Jockey Hollow, metal detecting and photogrammetry proved to be the most useful investigative techniques.

Richard Veit, Ph.D. is Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University. In 2007 he was the recipient of Monmouth University’s distinguished teacher award.  He has served on the board of the Archaeological Society of New Jersey since 1994, and is a Past President of the organization. He has authored or co-authored numerous articles and reviews and five books including Digging New Jersey’s Past: Historical Archaeology in the Garden State (Rutgers Press 2002), New Jersey Cemeteries and Tombstones History in the Landscape (co-authored by Mark Nonestied, Rutgers Press 2008), and New Jersey: A History of the Garden State (co-authored with Maxine Lurie, Rutgers Press 2012).  He also regular presents on topics relating to historical archaeology and New Jersey history and has been a TED speaker.

Next tentative meeting dates are:

  • October 7th
  • December 2nd
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